On Jews counting -another look at the problem of antisemitism in British politics

I wanted to revisit the issue of antisemitism here in the UK. I wrote a little bit more about this recently in the light of the Stephen Sizer case and this article builds a little on this one which looked at how someone who would not consider themselves, nor be considered by others as hating… Continue reading On Jews counting -another look at the problem of antisemitism in British politics

Stephen Sizer and when church discipline doesn’t seem possible

The Stephen Sizer tribunal reached its verdict a few weeks back and concluded that he had engaged in antisemitic behaviour on at least one occasion whilst also causing offense to Jewish people and that “the Respondent’s conduct was unbecoming or inappropriate to the office and work of a clerk in Holy Orders”[1] The Bishop of… Continue reading Stephen Sizer and when church discipline doesn’t seem possible

“Don’t you tell me what to do”

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The Guardian reports Trying to stop friends and relations from making certain life choices such as whether to take a new job or start a family could “violate a crucial moral right”, according to a new paper by a Cambridge philosopher. Dr Farbod Akhlaghi, a moral philosopher at Christ’s College, argues that everyone has a… Continue reading “Don’t you tell me what to do”

Saving the national health service (part 2) Funding and social care

In my first article about the current NHS crisis, I argued that we needed to look more at capacity and demand. At this time of year, there’s usually greater pressure on the NHS and specifically on A&E services due to seasonal illnesses and health threats.  In particularly we can usually expect a spike in influenza… Continue reading Saving the national health service (part 2) Funding and social care

Another example of how conspiracy theories work

Here’s a good example of how bizarre Conspiracy Theories work. There’s currently a conspiracy theory going round that the COVID19 vaccine causes heart attacks and so, left right and centre, people are dropping dead of heart attacks. So, along comes Laurence Fox, who was okay in Lewis, but has since taken an unfortunate journey into… Continue reading Another example of how conspiracy theories work

The death of conversation

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Conversation and debate seem to be dying.  Social media, especially forms like twitter are probably not helping with this.  I reflected on this a little bit more over the past couple of days from two observations.  First, I’ve noticed a pattern on social media. It runs like this: Original Poster  “Here’s my particular hot take. … Continue reading The death of conversation

In defence of Sunday restrictions

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Tom Harwood is a journalist and commentator with GB News and he’s not happy about the UK’s remaining restrictions on Sunday Trading as this tweet shows. Now, I can’t help but make too general comments here.  First, that in my experience, if you are shopping at the big superstores then you tend to be doing… Continue reading In defence of Sunday restrictions

The difference between debate and conspiracy theory

I wanted to come back to one of the specific issues in my article about a possible “perplexing silence.”  One of the things I frequently hear these days is that Christians are susceptible to conspiracy theories.  On the other side of the coin I hear Christians complain  that the accusation of “conspiracy theories” silences debate… Continue reading The difference between debate and conspiracy theory

Antisemitism -and when your defence further implicates

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Squawk box is one of those websites that offers an alternative approach to the news, claiming to correct the mainstream media.  A number of such outlets exist on both the alt-right and the far left. Squawkbox is a left-wing version. One of the main priorities on the far left over the past couple of years… Continue reading Antisemitism -and when your defence further implicates

A perplexing silence?

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Peter Mead thinks that there has been a perplexing silence from Christian leaders and that it has been left to others to “speak the hard truths.”  He writes about this in a three part series here, here and here. Now, as I’ve written a few times, I think that our track record as conservative evangelicals… Continue reading A perplexing silence?