In defence of complementarianism

Photo by RODNAE Productions on Pexels.com

One of the things I’ve seen coming up again and again is the suggestion that part of the problem with conservative evangelical culture that needs to change is complementarianism. Indeed, you will notice that the push is to argue that complementarianism is not only a risk factor for creating abusive cultures but furthermore is, in… Continue reading In defence of complementarianism

Women teaching men revisited – another look at 2 Timothy 2:12

One of the key verses in the debate about the role of men and women in the church, especially in relation to teaching, preaching and leadership is 2 Timothy 2:12 which says: “12 I do not permit a woman to teach or to exercise authority over a man; rather, she is to remain quiet.” There has… Continue reading Women teaching men revisited – another look at 2 Timothy 2:12

Is there such a thing as Biblical Manhood?

Quite a few years back now, the Council for Biblical Manhood and Womanhood was set up by the likes of John Piper and Wayne Grudem. The primary purpose of CBMW was to advocate for complementarianism – the belief that men and women  are made equal but different so that husbands are to exercise headship in… Continue reading Is there such a thing as Biblical Manhood?

Panel of Nans

Photo by Ricardo Esquivel on Pexels.com

Sarah’s Grandma had a knack of predicting accurately the winner of the X Factor and of Britain’s Got Talent each year. It made me think that a fantastic spin off show would involve getting 4 grandmas to sit as the judging panel for the next talent contest -hence the show title “panel of nans.” I… Continue reading Panel of Nans

Re-mapping the Gender Role debate

Photo by Magda Ehlers on Pexels.com

We tend to describe the debate about gender roles in church and the family as divided between egalitarians and complementarians.  However, I have been wondering whether this properly captures the nuances of the discussion.  So, here is an attempt to remap where the agreement and disagreement is. I am starting with the assumption that the… Continue reading Re-mapping the Gender Role debate

Leadership is not about the committee you attend

Photo by James Frid on Pexels.com

Imagine if the way that your family functioned was that the husband/dad went down to the garden shed and made some decisions. Maybe he called round a few other men to join him for this meeting. Then afterwards, they came out and pronounced their wisdom. You can be by conviction a complementarian and still feel… Continue reading Leadership is not about the committee you attend

Biblical Manhood and Womanhood – Hierarchialism and Complementarianism are simply not the same

I am a complementarian in terms of my views of men and women and their roles in church and home.  This means that I believe men and women are not interchangeable.  This has two specific (and only two) applications. It means that Ephesians 5 talks about husbands sacrificially loving their wives, wives submitting to their… Continue reading Biblical Manhood and Womanhood – Hierarchialism and Complementarianism are simply not the same

When pastoral questions might be linked (A further response to Beth Moore)

I want to come back to Beth Moore’s questions.  Now we assumed that the two questions were hypothetical and that they were about two distinct scenarios. However, suppose that they weren’t.  Of course, only Beth Moore knows the answer to that. Certainly I get the feel that they are at least based on her wealth… Continue reading When pastoral questions might be linked (A further response to Beth Moore)

Husbands, wives, Ephesians 5 and mental health (responding to Beth Moore’s questions)

Earlier in the week, Beth Moore asked two questions, specifically aimed at men who hold to a complementarian view of male/female relationships in the church and family.[1]  Whilst she asked for quick tweet answers, I wanted to make a fuller response. So here it is. My friend Steve Kneale has also written and so I… Continue reading Husbands, wives, Ephesians 5 and mental health (responding to Beth Moore’s questions)