Pints, cake and retrospective justice

#Partygate is the scandal that keeps on giving.  In a bid to distract from their own troubles, the Tories have tried to put the focus on an incident during the local elections last year where Keir Starmer was videoed drinking beer in Durham.  Their claim is that the leader of the opposition was also in… Continue reading Pints, cake and retrospective justice

Representative justice and mercy

The reaction to the Downing Street parties scandal has been fascinating.  I wrote a little bit about his here the other day but I wanted to pick up  a bit further on one particular response.  It’s best represented by this tweet from Owen Jones. Obviously, Jones is driven in part by an assumption that punishment… Continue reading Representative justice and mercy

Statues, parties and rule breaking

There have been two big cases in the last few weeks which have got people talking about what it means to be a rule breaker and what lawlessness looks like. First, there’s the Colston case where the protestors who tipped the statue of a Bristol slaver trader into the sea were brought to trial only… Continue reading Statues, parties and rule breaking

Can a jury decide not guilty if they think the sentence is unjust?

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Frances Crook, formally head of the Howard League For Penal Reform tweeted this comment. I’m not sure how long the tweet will stay up because it raises significant issues, not just in terms of morality but in terms of Legality Juries have a responsibility to remain within the Law and to fulfil the specific duties… Continue reading Can a jury decide not guilty if they think the sentence is unjust?

Shemima Begum

In 2019, Shemima Begum left Britain as a 15 year old to join ISIL along with two other school girls. In Syria she married a Jihadist and had children with him that died. She was later found in a refugee camp. The Home Secretary with Tribunal support determined that she should be stripped of her… Continue reading Shemima Begum

Abolition of Slavery – late adopters?

I’ve written about how a careful reading of Scripture demanded the abolition of slavery. The existence of the slave trade and the continued ownership of African slaves went against God’s word, specifically Paul’s teaching in his letters (including in Ephesians 6).  Those who were subjected to the brutality of slavery will have got it. Eventually… Continue reading Abolition of Slavery – late adopters?

How we respond to asylum policies is likely to depend on our presuppositions

Steve Kneale has argued here that we need a different type of blue-skies thinking to get to grips with the issue of asylum. He helpfully identifies a number of problems with the current situation and some of the suggested solutions. He then goes on to make some of his own recommendations. The challenge with responding… Continue reading How we respond to asylum policies is likely to depend on our presuppositions

The narrow gate

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13 “Enter by the narrow gate. For the gate is wide and the way is easy[a] that leads to destruction, and those who enter by it are many. 14 For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few[1] We have been thinking about what it means to be part… Continue reading The narrow gate

Was Billy Graham right? Is it just my job to love?

This is one of those quotes that sounds brilliant at first but after a little bit of reflection leaves one feeling uneasy. I guess that when Billy Graham said it, he had Matthew 7:1-6 in mind. In that sense the quote should warn us against the harsh judgementalism that we too often see -especially on… Continue reading Was Billy Graham right? Is it just my job to love?