The vaccine and abortion (3) Doing ethics from three perspectives

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There are three general approaches to how we make ethical decisions. Sometimes in history they have functioned as competing schools of thought but some contemporary thinkers (particularly John Frame) suggest that in fact we need all three perspectives to make decisions.  I’m going to outline them here – probably a little (a lot?) simplified for… Continue reading The vaccine and abortion (3) Doing ethics from three perspectives

The vaccine and abortion (2) How do we make ethical decisions?

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The other day. I posted an article looking at the moral dilemma created by the fact that over the years, those creating vaccines have relied on cells harvested from aborted embryos in order to cultivate vaccines.  A few people began to openly wrestle with the implications to this.  They expressed discomfort at the news and… Continue reading The vaccine and abortion (2) How do we make ethical decisions?

The vaccine and abortion

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I’ve seen a range of reasons given over the past few months for refusing the COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available.  Some of them are understandable including concerns about whether we know about all potential side effects yet. Some people see it as a freedom issue, although as things stand, the vaccine won’t be compulsory,… Continue reading The vaccine and abortion

Why attempting to control COVID is not an idolatrous attempt to conquer death

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A narrative is emerging from some quarters of the church that measures to deal with the pandemic represent state and societal hubris, a humanistic confidence in our ability to defeat death. If this was the case, then we would be dealing with idolatry. Of course, as Christians we should not be surprised to see evidence… Continue reading Why attempting to control COVID is not an idolatrous attempt to conquer death