A lens to look through

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In this week’s #FaithrootsLive we continued to examine the issue of male and female leadership roles in church by beginning to look at hermeneutics. How do we know that we are interpreting and applying the passages that talk about men and women correctly? In order to answer the question, we are considering a case study… Continue reading A lens to look through

Wesley and the slave trade (5) conclusions

In summary, we may conclude that our investigation supports our preliminary thesis.  First, that Wesley’s hermeneutic does not fit the template of the so-called Wesleyan Quadrilateral and thus secondly, that his argument does not support a Redemptive Movement Hermeneutic.  Before we develop our conclusions further, we need to spell out some limitations which constrain what… Continue reading Wesley and the slave trade (5) conclusions

Wesley and the slave trade (4) What does Wesley actually do with Scripture?

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In the previous section, we noted three assertions that might be made about Wesley’s use of Scripture in support of a redemptive-movement position.  First, that Wesley would be willing to ignore texts if they didn’t fit his overall scheme.  Secondly, that he could change his view of Scripture based on experience.  Thirdly, that he was… Continue reading Wesley and the slave trade (4) What does Wesley actually do with Scripture?

Wesley and the slave trade (3) Why does Wesley argue from outside of Scripture?

3.1 The Quadrilateral Position Marquadt’s claim that Wesley bases his arguments outside Scripture seems to come from his statement: “I would now inquire, whether these things can be defended, on the principles of even heathen honesty; whether they can be reconciled (setting the Bible out of the question) with any degree of either justice or… Continue reading Wesley and the slave trade (3) Why does Wesley argue from outside of Scripture?

John Wesley and the Slave Trade (1) Introduction

On the 2nd February 1807, the House of Commons voted in favour of the abolition of the slave trade.[1]  The celebration of the 200th anniversary of this event generated substantial interest in the subject of slavery, the history of abolition and the particular individuals involved, especially William Wilberforce.  Biographies were written, museum displays opened and… Continue reading John Wesley and the Slave Trade (1) Introduction

Christian Patriarchy may be following the wrong trajectory

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Patriarchy seems to be a dominant word at the moment. It’s being used as a term of accusation and abuse against complementarians. For example, Beth Allison Barr whose book I reviewed recently identifies this as the big problem with conservative evangelicalism. It is also being used as a badge of honour by some who say… Continue reading Christian Patriarchy may be following the wrong trajectory

Do we need to learn to doubt?

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Schools are returning after lockdown and the summer break, soon students will be heading off to University too.  So what should they be learning? What should professors and tutors be teaching their students? Here is one suggested list. It seems a good list doesn’t it? I agree that we should be teaching students how to… Continue reading Do we need to learn to doubt?

Does each Scripture have more than one meaning?

This is a question I heard the other day. It’s quite a common one.  At one end of the spectrum is the insistence that yes, when you read Scripture there is a specific purpose and meaning and you should not deviate from it. At the other end of the spectrum you will hear people say… Continue reading Does each Scripture have more than one meaning?